FAQ

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FAQ

I. What strength concrete should you use?
Many municipalities have minimum requirements for various uses of concrete, especially for the curbs and public sidewalks. These change from municipality to municipality and the local requirements should be followed. Other strength requirements may be set by an engineer, architect or other design professional if you are using one.
The minimum strength concrete we produce is a 3000 psi mix. This strength is achieved by 28 days under controlled conditions.  We normally work with a safety factor to meet or exceed this strength at the job site, however site conditions or weather extremes may keep any concrete from reaching its full potential.  We usually recommend a #3500 mix for steps and sidewalks along with a curing compound and/or sealer to combat salt and ice damage. 

II. What does PSI mean?
PSI means pounds of pressure per square inch. For example, our 3000 psi will withstand 3000 pounds per square inch.
III. What does metered mean?
We mix the concrete as it comes out so you only pay for what you need. We have a meter that tells us how much concrete has come out.
IV. What does site mix mean?
We mix the concrete on the job site. This means the concrete is fresher and more accurate.
V. What weather can I pour concrete in?
We can deliver concrete to you in weather warmer than 32 degrees Fahrenheit. We can deliver in the rain; however, this effects the curing process.
VI. What does the curing process mean?
It is the process by which concrete hardens. A chemical reaction bonds the aggregate together, creating a solid mass. Typically, the process takes 28 days for the full reaction to complete. After this time, its full strength has been met.
VII. What size jobs do you pour?
We can very easily pour jobs up to 25 yards. We have 3 different trucks we use. Our trucks, individually, can hold 6, 8, and 9 yards.
VIII. How should I protect my concrete for the snow?
The best thing to do put a water repellant sealer over the concrete before winter is here. This is because, as S. Walker Haines explains, “rapidly melting snow or ice with salt or other chemicals can hurt it. The problem is moisture in concrete can also freeze and then rapidly thaw. Water, as it forms ice, actually expands a bit as it changes state, and then shrinks as it cools.”